Vegetarian Kyiv Part I: Simple Everyday Cafes

Kyiv is an awesome city for vegetarians: it’s true, at least in 2018. The same cannot be said for the rest of Ukraine, in my experience, but in Kyiv it’s possible to do really well. Let’s start with the standouts for everyday lunches.

IMG_2630

Green 13, in the Bessarabian Market on Kreshatyk, is my absolute fave. They’ve got a tofu burger that’s to die for. It’s just a slab of seared tofu on a bun, but they top it with pesto, vegan mayo, pickled onions, really fresh wonderful cucumber pickles, sauteed mushrooms, lettuce, and tomato. The result is really stunning, especially if you’ve been eating Ukrainian food for weeks and would kill for tofu.

IMG_2632

I love this burger, but I should warn you that this is a burger for people who love toppings and don’t want the taste of the burger to overwhelm. (This is my beef with black-bean patties: the taste of black-beaniness inevitably dominates.) Of course, there are other items on the menu, but I have to admit that I’ve never had anything else although I’ve been there like 15 times. If it ain’t broke… They’ve also got charging stations and free water. There’s some seating, but mostly at benches without tables–it’s not a super comfortable place. But it’s cheap–around 60 UAH ($2) for a burger that would cost $12 in Chicago.

Literaturne Kafe Imbyr near the Olimpiska metro station is another top favorite. They’ve got a small but powerful all-veg menu, including an awesome soba noodle dish with vegetables and tofu and, for breakfast, a tofu scramble with avocado toast. (Their English menu refers to this latter dish as an omelet, so I was expecting eggs, but it’s definitely a tofu scramble.) Their drink selection is vast and interesting. Once I had a lovely almond milk cappuccino; another time I had a strangely delicious drink that appeared to be ginger tea mixed with pureed pear. This cafe is significantly more expensive than Green 13, but it’s got a cozy atmosphere with comfortable chairs–a good place to hang out for an hour.

IMG_2839
Lunch at my university’s canteen. Go to the cafes in this post if you have had too many meals in Ukraine that look like this.

If you’re in Kyiv and dying for a salad that is not made of mayonnaise and cabbage, try the chain Salateria. They have a nice build-your-own salad option and they have tofu (though no avocado, at least at the locations I’ve visited). The ingredients are fresh and the serving sizes approach American levels. Pro-tip: they plop a giant spoonful of dressing on the salad but they don’t mix it in. The dressings also don’t quite match up with their titles for an American audience. So ask for the dressing on the side if you’re a little iffy or want to control your own dressing quantity. Salateria isn’t quite to the level of Sweetgreen, but they do have actual bowls and glasses, and they are located in Ukraine. They’ve got a water station as well–with glasses, lemon, and mint. The ambience is total fast food–not a place to hang out.

IMG_1224
Despite this sentiment, expressed here at Andriyivsky Descent in summer 2017, vegetarians can do well in Kyiv.

Next time: fancier spots for dinner and drinks.

 

Planning: Ukraine & Germany this summer!

This summer, I’m excited to be volunteering as an English language teacher with GoCamps, part of a UN-funded NGO that aims to increase access to foreign-language learning for Ukrainian kids. I don’t know where I’ll be placed yet, but I’ll stay with a family for three weeks and work with a schoolteacher in a summer-camp format, teaching middle- and high-school aged kids. I’m so excited I can barely stand it. I’ve started to stock up on English-language stickers to bring to the kids and I’m taking a Ukrainian language course at Chicago’s wonderful language school, Language Loop. I’m no whiz at languages, but I hope that I’ll be able to read signs and at least make an attempt at communicating with people.

In preparation, I’m also reading. From a colleague I heard about a masterpiece of modern Yiddish literature, the Family Mashber, by the pseudonymous Ukrainian writer Der Nister. The story behind this book’s creation and publication is tragic and the novel itself sounds like an epic work. It’s next on my list as soon as I get out of my current Tom Sharpe phase. I’ve also just learned of the Kalyna Language Press, which publishes works of contemporary Ukrainian literature, both poetry and prose, in English translation. This is really exciting, because it’s certainly not easy to find much contemporary Eastern European writing in English translation at all. I’ve got a bunch of these novels in my Amazon shopping cart.

My Lonely Planet Ukraine guidebook already arrived, and it’s seriously disappointing. I shouldn’t have bothered. I know these guidebooks get out of date, but wow–not only is there no mention of the Russian invasion of Ukraine but the book has happy-go-lucky tourist recommendations for Crimea and Donetsk.

After my work in Ukraine, I’m heading to Berlin for a week–because I love Berlin (Europe’s best destination for vegetarians on a budget, in my view) and because I’ve been studying German and I’m anxious to try out my new language skills. I’ve been trying to find an AirBnB on the Karl Marx Allee for maximum Cold War nostalgia, but no dice so far. I’ll post more about my Berlin plans as they unfold.

img_1524
The Karl Marx Allee, 2013

I do think I’ve figured out my Kyiv-Berlin transport plan, though. The only direct flights seem to be available through Ukrainian Airlines for around 200USD. WizzAir and other budget airlines fly to Ukraine but do not seem to operate on this particular route. For whatever reason, Kyiv-Hamburg or Munich or Cologne would be much cheaper. So I think I’m going to take the train, which will be massively exciting for me. I didn’t start traveling to Europe until after the budget airlines appeared, so I haven’t taken trains all that much, though I dream about how cool it would be to cross Russia on the Trans-Siberian Railroad.

Using the excellent resource Seat 61, I’ve learned that Kyiv-Berlin is a pretty straightforward journey and can be accomplished without night trains. I can spend a bonus night in Krakow instead. The trains on these routes are pretty modern and air-conditioned, and you wait at the Ukraine-Poland border while the train is moved from Russian to European style wheels. Sounds fascinating to me. I can’t wait to see the whole of Poland–I think this will be a more pleasing option than just a flight, since I have a few spare days before I meet my husband in Berlin.

With all this planning, last night I had to watch one of the greatest European travel movies of all time (to this child of the 80s): National Lampoon’s European Vacation. I’ll leave you with one of its many classic scenes, recreated in my own family’s vacations more than once (in less exciting locales) when I was a kid.